When setting prices for my products or services, what should I consider?

There are different individual costs for each component of your service or product. Be sure to analyze every component of the product or service’s total cost. Upon completion of the analysis, prices can be established to maximize profits and eliminate deficit services. Material, labor and overhead costs are included in the cost components.

Material costs are the total of the costs of all materials of the finished product.

Labor costs are calculated based on the total work put into preparing the product. To determine the direct labor costs, you multiply the cost of labor per hour by the number of personnel hours necessary to finish the job. Be sure to include the dollar value of fringe benefits as well as the hourly wage, which include workers’ compensation, retirement benefits, social security, insurance, unemployment compensation, etc.

Overhead costs cannot be easily identified with a product. They consist of indirect materials, such as depreciation, supplies, advertising, heat and light, taxes, rent, insurance, and transportation. Indirect labor costs, such as legal, clerical, and janitorial services are also included in overhead costs. Don’t forget to include shipping, handling and/or storage and any other cost components.

Posted in: Marketing and Pricing

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